how to hide wood filler after staining?

It’s easy to get frustrated when you discover that your project has gaps in the wood. These gaps can be unsightly and make your furniture look unfinished, but there are many ways to hide wood filler that will make it look seamless. In this article, I’ll discuss some techniques for hiding wood filler after staining:

use a dark stain on the wood filler

The second way to hide wood filler after staining is to use a dark stain on your project. Darker stains tend to hide imperfections better than light stains, so you won’t have to worry as much about the filling in your project showing through the stain.

If you’re using a dark stain (like ebony or black), then you can even use it without sanding at all! In fact, most people won’t even notice that there was any filler used at all because of how well it’s hidden by the dark color.

use a wood putty that is pre-stained

One of the easiest ways to hide wood filler is using pre-stained wood putty. This type of filler comes in many different colors and brands, so you’ll be able to find something that works for your needs. If you’re not sure where to start, company ABC has an excellent selection of pre-stained wood putty in every shade imaginable.

make sure to match the wood putty to the color of the wood you are attaching

The key to successful wood putty is matching the color of the fill to the color of your wood. If you use a dark filler, it will be noticeable that you filled a hole and are not natural looking. It’s best to use a lighter shade of putty so it blends into your stain or paint.

If you are attaching pieces together and want them to look like they were done at one time, use matching wood putties that will blend together seamlessly.

use a gel-based stain instead of a water-based stain

You may have noticed that wood finishing products come in two different forms: water-based and gel. Both products can be used to achieve the same result, but gel-based stains are more durable, have a longer open time (the time when the stain is wet), and are less likely to drip or run.

Water-based stains tend to be thicker than their gel counterparts and require more coats for proper coverage. The thicker consistency means they won’t absorb into the finish coat as easily and will leave your surface feeling tacky after application.

fill in the gap with sawdust from the same type of wood (if possible) and then stain over it

  • Fill in the gap with sawdust from the same type of wood (if possible) and then stain over it.
  • Use a wood putty that is pre-stained to match your existing finish.
  • Apply a gel-based stain instead of a water-based stain.

use a sharp knife to gently scrape away any excess putty after it has dried (this will leave only what is actually in the gap)

  • Use a sharp knife to gently scrape away any excess putty after it has dried (this will leave only what is actually in the gap).
  • The best way to get rid of any remaining wood filler is by sanding the surface again, this time with 220 grit sandpaper or finer, and then staining over the area again, but avoiding it this time!

apply plenty of coats of stain on top of your wood filler, until there are no more visible lines left behind by sanding off excess putty

Once you have sanded your wood filler to a smooth finish, it’s time to apply the stain. The key here is applying as many coats of stain as necessary until there are no more visible lines left behind by sanding off the excess putty. You want to let each coat dry thoroughly before applying another layer to it.

It doesn’t matter if the stain gets on your project or anywhere else in your house (unless you’re trying to hide something). Don’t worry about getting any of this stuff on top of your furniture—it’ll come out with some elbow grease later!

apply some water-based polyurethane on top of your finished project so that all stains will stay hidden forever!

Polyurethane is a wonderful product that can be used to protect your project and hide any imperfections you might have made while staining. Polyurethane will not affect the color of your project, and it’s also great at protecting the wood filler so that no one will ever know what you did!

There are many ways to hide wood filler. By using these techniques, you can have a beautiful project without having unsightly gaps anywhere.

There are many ways to hide wood filler. By using these techniques, you can have a beautiful project without having unsightly gaps anywhere.

  • Use a dark stain on the wood filler. If you use an oil-based stain or paint, it’s going to be harder for the lighter color of your putty to show through and match the rest of your project. However, if you use a darker color on top of your putty, then it won’t be as noticeable when matched with other parts of your project that are darker in color as well (or even just naturally).
  • Use pre-stained wood putty instead of regular brown-colored stuff from Home Depot/Lowes/etc… This way all you have to do is cut off what size chunk will fit into the gap then press down firmly so there aren’t any bubbles left behind — which means less sanding later!

This works great when attaching molding because most moldings come with pre-mixed stains already included; therefore matching isn’t really an issue because they’re already made that way!

Conclusion

Now you know what to do with wood filler. It’s not hard, and it will save you time and money in the long run. You don’t have to have a professional hide your wood filler – just follow these simple steps!

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